PPG-painted cars took home major awards at the recent Shades of the Past 35th annual Hot Rod Roundup and the Goodguys 31st West Coast Nationals. Both events attract some of the nation’s best custom car builds, making for highly spirited awards contests.

At Shades of the Past, held September 8–9 at Dollywood’s Splash Country in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., the Street Rodder Triple Crown of Rodding—consisting of three prestigious honors: Best Street Rod, Best Street Machine and Best Street Cruiser—drew a competitive field with PPG cars claiming two of the three major awards.

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Best Street Rod:  1932 Ford Tudor Sedan

The Best Street Rod award went to a 1932 Ford Tudor Sedan owned by George Poteet, Memphis, Tenn., and built by the capable craftsmen at Johnson’s Hot Road Shop in Gadsden, Ala. Greg Chalcraft and Wesley Johnson did the elegant bodywork. Chalcraft also painted the Ford and gave it a rich, deep black finish using VIBRANCE COLLECTION® VP2050 DTM High Build Primer, DP90LF Non-Sanding Epoxy Primer Black and DELTRON® 2000 DBC9700 Basecoat Black along with GLOBAL REFINISH SYSTEM® D8115 Matte Clearcoat, D8117 Semi-Gloss Clearcoat and D8152 Performance + Glamour Clearcoat. The car is no stranger to recognition, having been a recent Detroit Autorama Ridler Award contender.

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Best Street Machine:  1969 Camaro

“Inferno,” a bright yellow 1969 Camaro owned by John Wilkus of Lakeville, Minn., captured the Best Street Machine title. The Camaro was built and painted by the talented team at the Roadster Shop, Mundelein, Ill., under the direction of owners Jeremy and Phil Gerber. Inferno blends styling, power and an expert paint job by Alan Palmer. He used ENVIROBASE® High Performance waterborne basecoat, Global Refinish System D8152 Performance + Glamour Clearcoat, OEM colors McLaren Volcano Yellow (code 937178) and Ferrari Argento Nurburgring (code 36520), and Deltron DMD1683 Basecoat Black toner to give the car its award-winning finish. The car has appeared on the cover of Hot Rod and taken awards at Goodguys events.

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America's Most Beautiful Street Rod:  1933 Ford Roadster

Over at the Goodguys 31st West Coast Nationals, held in Pleasanton, Calif., at the Alameda County Fairgrounds, August 25–27, a 1933 Ford Roadster dubbed “Renaissance Roadster” took home the top prize when it was named America’s Most Beautiful Street Rod. The car is owned by Buddy Jordan of San Antonio, Texas, and was built by Steve Frisbie and his team at Steve’s Auto Restorations in Portland, Ore. It was the Ridler Award winner at the 2017 Detroit Autorama. The original design for the roadster came from a rendering by designer Chris Ito with additional inspiration from Frisbie and another team member, designer David Brost. Painter Jay Spencer gave the Ford its dazzling candy-apple red and black appearance spraying an array of PPG refinish products. These included several products from the Deltron brand: 2000 DBC9700 Basecoat Black, DCU 2021 CONCEPT® Urethane Clear, and DMD1696 Coarse Silver Dollar Aluminum along with Vibrance Collection RADIANCE® II DMX214 Red Violet and DMX213 Red (Blue Shade) Dye and CRYSTALLANCE® VM4501 Silver from the glass flake collection.

The Shades of the Past show includes hot rods, street rods, classics and customs up to 1972. Many of the vehicles are original well-preserved models while others have been turned into customized automotive art by imaginative builders and painters. PPG is a strong supporter of the event and its participants.

With more than 70,000 active members, the Goodguys Rod & Custom Association is one of the world’s largest rod and custom associations. The organization produces automotive events across the country. PPG is the official paint supplier to the organization and exhibits at all national and many regional Goodguys events. There, PPG displays the latest automotive refinish products, hottest colors and custom tones, unique pigments and special-effect finishes available from the Envirobase High Performance, Vibrance Collection and Deltron lineups as well as other PPG brands.

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